QUALITY OF LIFE Foundation for Autism Support and Training

Quality of Life Profile and Indicators for Typical Adults as well as Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Quality of Life indicators are the same for adults with autism as for typical adults (to a greater or lesser degree) and include issues relating to health, diet, hygiene, emotional well-being, living environment, family and social relationships, companionship, education, fulfilling work, enjoyable leisure activities, and independent living skills.

In this major study of Quality of Life (QOL) concepts and indicators by the Centre for Health Promotion of the University of Toronto, three categories of QOL were defined, each with three sub-categories, and based on same characteristics that make life good for typical people and people with autism. "Being" refers to aspects of the person, "Belonging" to aspects of how people fit with other people and places, and "Becoming" to aspects of daily activities that promote personal growth, development and adaptation to life. Each of the major categories is then amplified as follows:

Physical Being My body and health:
Looking after physical health
Eating a balanced diet
Hygiene and body care
 
Psychological Being My thoughts and feelings:
Self-control
Self-concept
Freedom from anxiety
 
Spiritual Being My beliefs and values:
Understanding right and wrong
Attaching meaning to life
Celebrating life
 
Physical Belonging Where I live:
Place of residence
Space for privacy
Living in a neighborhood
 
Social Belonging The people around me:
Having a spouse or special person
Family
Friends
 
Community Belonging

My connectedness to the resources in my community:

Access to meaningful work
Access to community places
Access to education
 
Practical Becoming My practical daily activities:
Work, school or program
Work around the home
Looking after people/pets
 
Leisure Becoming What I do for fun and enjoyment:
Visiting and socializing
Casual leisure activities
Hobbies
 
Growth Becoming What I do to change, grow and adapt:
Learning about new things
Attaining new independent living skills
Adjusting to changes in life
 
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